With 76 inkings, a tattoo artist creates a “insane” stop-motion animation on real skin.

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With 76 inkings, a tattoo artist creates a “insane” stop-motion animation on real skin.

A tattoo artist used 76 inkings to create an astonishing moving image of a Betty Boop cartoon scene.

Phil Berge, a Montreal-based artist, carefully tattooed a cartoon character on a variety of people and then combined the photos to create a stop-motion animation effect on real skin.

Berge posted his work on his TikTok account, @philberge, on Tuesday, and it has already been seen over 12 million times. The video was so popular that it was also shared on Reddit.

“Finally!” says the caption on the video, which you can see here. To make this scene from Betty Boop Snow White, I used a total of 76 tattoos. Thank you so much to everyone who agreed to get tattooed for this project.”

On his Instagram account, he elaborated, stating, “I did a total of 76 tattoos to achieve this moment from Betty Boop Snow White.” Fleischer Studios used the rotoscope technology to recreate Cab Calloway dancing to the St. James infirmary song in the original, which was released in 1933. Thank you so much to everyone who came out and got inked for this project. We can build incredible s*** if we work together.”

According to Berge, the scene is from a seven-minute black-and-white film about Betty attempting to flee her stepmother’s grasp, who orders her decapitation after a magical mirror declares Betty the fairest in the land.

The clown Bimbo dancing and the ghost the evil stepmother turns him into are depicted in the scene Berge wanted to bring to life through a series of tattoos.

@philbergeFinally! To make this scene from Betty Boop Snow White, I used a total of 76 tattoos. Thank you so much to everyone who participated in this initiative by being tattooed. #fleischerstudios #cabcalloway #fleischerâTM St. James Infirmary – Cab Calloway #fyp #tattoo #tattoos #animation #stopmotion #fleischerstudios #cabcalloway #fleischer

Max Fleischer of Fleischer Studios pioneered the rotoscoping technology, which revolutionized cartoons by allowing animators to draw over photographs and subsequently films of people moving. This resulted in hauntingly realistic movement for the drawn characters.

Another of Fleischer’s films, Minnie the Moocher, included Calloway’s dancing. Live-action video of him performing with his orchestra opens the short. Later, an animated walrus sings the song. This is a condensed version of the information.

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