People Respond to HBO Max Test Email with “Dear Intern”: Their Biggest Career Mistakes

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People Respond to HBO Max Test Email with “Dear Intern”: Their Biggest Career Mistakes

Nobody is without flaws.

HBO Max sent a confusing “Integration Test” email to some of its members on Thursday night. HBO issued a statement via its official Twitter account apologizing for the “misleadingly sent” email and blaming the error on an intern. Many people took to social media to make jokes and memes about the incident. However, some people are now adopting the phrase “Dear Intern” as a kind gesture to disclose some of their biggest career errors to date.

On Friday afternoon, the hashtag “Dear Intern” became a popular topic on Twitter, with many people using the platform to share some of their most embarrassing—and hilarious—career-related gaffes. Despite the fact that the stories were written for HBO Max interns, they provided consolation to people of all ages and phases of their professions. The thousands of tweets serve as a reminder that mistakes do happen, and that one mistake does not define a career.

Tyler, a Twitter user, wrote, “Dear Intern.” “Once, I sent promotional emails to a client database and mixed up the discount codes, costing the business $15,000.” “I am still here.”

Mr. Intern,

I once sent promotional emails to a customer database and mixed up the discount codes, costing the business $15,000. I’m still around. https://t.co/ChszcDB5jz

— Tyler Price (@tylercprice_) June 18, 2021

A user by the name of Nick shared: “Dear intern, I once rolled out the wrong certificates to the entirety of https://gov.uk, very nearly taking it offline for the entire world. You’re doing great!”

“Dear Intern,” said Twitter user Eize. “As a very young copywriter I once had to write a brochure about a prescription drug that ‘reduces mortality in patients,’ but it turns out I actually wrote that it ‘reduces morality in patients’ and nobody caught it until 50,000 were printed.”

Dear Intern, as a very young copywriter I once had to write a brochure about a prescription drug that “reduces mortality in patients,” but it turns out I actually wrote that it “reduces morality in patients” and nobody caught it until 50,000 were printed. https://t.co/HrMqHIXhg0

— Eize Basa (@PonchoRebound) June 18, 2021

One broadcast engineer tweeted: “Dear Intern, It’s an email. At least you didn’t erase the entire Community Access TV. This is a brief summary.

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