After the G7 Summit in the United Kingdom, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is facing backlash for not staying at a designated quarantine hotel.

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After the G7 Summit in the United Kingdom, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is facing backlash for not staying at a designated quarantine hotel.

After this weekend’s G7 summit in the United Kingdom, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is under criticism for not staying at a certified quarantine hotel.

The prime minister and the Canadian team will quarantine at an Ottawa hotel once he returns from his first international trip since the pandemic began, according to Trudeau’s office, and will remain there until his PCR test comes back negative.

Trudeau flew out of Ottawa, Canada’s capital, on Thursday; Canadian prime ministers are not allowed to fly commercially due to security concerns. During the coronavirus pandemic, however, Ottawa is not one of the Canadian cities that accepts international aircraft.

International passengers have been routed to major airports in four cities—Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, and Calgary—where Canadian travelers must quarantine for up to three days at a government-designated airport hotel (following a negative PCR test).

The required hotel stay has been in effect since February, with officials estimating a cost of $2,000 for a 72-hour stay.

The government said on Wednesday that fully vaccinated Canadian people will no longer be required to stay in a hotel quarantine and will instead be isolated at home until a negative COVID test is returned.

Trudeau, on the other hand, has only recently got his first dose of the AstraZeneca COVID vaccination.

“The Prime Minister and the Canadian delegation flying to the United Kingdom and Belgium will follow strict public health protocols and procedures throughout their visit, while in transit, and when they return home,” Trudeau’s office said in a news release last week.

“These strict public health protocols, which include hotel quarantine in Ottawa, are for the Prime Minister and all of the delegation—including media—and are the same strict protocols every other traveler has to abide by,” Trudeau’s press secretary Alex Wellstead said in a statement to Washington Newsday.

Other elected leaders, on the other hand, argue that Trudeau’s plan adheres to the same processes that other Canadian passengers have had to follow.

Conservative MP John Barlow questioned Ian Stewart, the Director of the Public Health Agency of Canada, about Trudeau’s quarantine plans in the House of Commons Health Committee.

“I just find it odd that our prime minister is traveling worldwide, which he is advising every Canadian not to do, and there isn’t a very thorough strategy and plan in place for his quarantine,” Barlow says. This is a condensed version of the information.

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