With a bow and arrow, a fisherman catches a world-record 92-pound paddlefish.

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With a bow and arrow, a fisherman catches a world-record 92-pound paddlefish.

After catching a 92-pound paddlefish with a bow and arrow, a Montana fisherman has set a new world record for the heaviest paddlefish caught with a bow and arrow.

On June 8, Steve Harris Jr., of Sidney, Montana, brought his bowfishing gear to the Yellowstone River in the state’s east to look for paddlefish. According to the Montana Standard, he has caught at least one paddlefish every year for the previous 30 years.

According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the American paddlefish, which can grow up to 7 feet in length and weigh up to 400 pounds, is typically classified as primitive since it has been in North America since the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. The Chinese paddlefish, which used to be found in the Yangtze and Yellow river basins, is now thought to be extinct.

Harris told the Standard on Tuesday that he catches the fish using a bow and arrow since it is more difficult than traditional ways. He said that the species is “simply a fun to fish for, especially when you get excellent runoff.”

He explained that due of Sidney’s dirty waters, fishing for paddlefish was tough, and that he and his friend Justin Fisketjon were “probably the only ones around here who really do it.”

Harris and Fisketjon usually fish in the same region of the Yellowstone River where they’ve had previous success, peering into the water for hours waiting for the right moment to fire a paddlefish bow and arrow.

With an 87-pound paddlefish, Fisketjon previously held the record for the largest paddlefish caught with a bow and arrow. However, in 2019, an 89-pound catch in Nebraska broke the record.

According to the Standard, the Bowfishing Association of America is the only body that preserves records of fish captured using a bow and arrow in the United States, while the International Game Fish Association does not utilize the category.

“That night it came up right in front of us and then started swimming away where we could see the complete body and it just offered me a beautiful shot,” Harris told the Standard on June 8.

“He dashed out about 30 yards,” says the narrator. This is a condensed version of the information.

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