These 35 Senate Republicans voted against the commission’s January 6 start date.

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These 35 Senate Republicans voted against the commission’s January 6 start date.

A bill to create a commission to investigate the violence at the US Capitol on January 6 was defeated by Senate Republicans on Friday, with 35 conservative members voting against it.

Only six Republican senators, including Louisiana’s Bill Cassidy, Maine’s Susan Collins, Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski, Ohio’s Rob Portman, Utah’s Mitt Romney, and Nebraska’s Ben Sasse, broke ranks with the party to support establishing the January 6 panel.

Eleven senators, including nine Republicans, were absent from the vote. Sen. Patrick Toomey, a Republican, missed the vote due to a “family engagement,” but claimed he “would have voted in favor of the motion.”

“A crowd has taken over the Capitol, and we can’t get the Republicans to assist us in producing a historical record of it?” Before the vote, Democratic Senator Dick Durbin said, “That is unfortunate.” “That explains why the Senate is broken and why the filibuster is broken.”

The establishment of a January 6 commission, which would be modeled after the 9/11 inquiry, has been postponed for months due to disagreements over the panel’s composition and scope.

Some Republicans, like House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, are against the plan because they want the committee to look into far-left political violence as well. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, for example, has lambasted the idea as a “purely political exercise.”

“I do not believe that the superfluous panel proposed by Democratic leaders will find critical new information or foster healing. “To be honest, I don’t think it’s even meant to achieve that,” McConnell said on the Senate floor ahead of the vote on Thursday.

The plan would create a 10-member body, with Democrats appointing five commissioners and Republicans appointing five commissioners. It would also require that any subpoenas issued during the investigation be signed by both parties.

The panel would be tasked with investigating the facts and circumstances surrounding the attack on the US Capitol, as well as any influencing elements that may have contributed to it. A crowd of pro-Donald Trump supporters attempted to disrupt the congressional certification of Joe Biden’s electoral victory, and five people died during or shortly after the disturbance.

The bill was finally passed by the House of Representatives. This is a condensed version of the information.

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