The Epic Failure of a Woman The Attempt to Prove the Magnet Vaccine Conspiracy Has Gone Viral

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The Epic Failure of a Woman The Attempt to Prove the Magnet Vaccine Conspiracy Has Gone Viral

A video of a woman attempting and failing to prove the conspiracy belief that metal items stick to the skin as a result of the COVID-19 vaccine has gone viral, with 3.4 million views on Twitter.

Tyler Buchanan commented on the video, saying, “Wow.” In a state legislative committee in Ohio, an anti-vaccine nurse attempted to prove the Vaccines Cause Magnetism thesis. The protest did not go as planned.”

The woman says on the video: “Vaccines do do harm to humans. By the way, while I was at lunch, I discovered something that I wanted to show you.

“I found out about doctor Tenpenny’s testimony on magnetic vaccination crystals because you mentioned it. So I’ve got a key and a bobby pin.”

Wow, it was incredible. In an Ohio state legislative hearing, an anti-vaccine nurse attempted to prove the Vaccines Cause Magnetism thesis. The demonstration did not go as planned, as you can see in the photo. https://twitter.com/ubELst4E8

June 9, 2021 — Tyler Buchanan (@Tylerjoelb)

She places the key on the bare skin of her chest, which appears to stay still for a few seconds, and says: “Explain to me why the key sticks to me.”

The woman then says, “It sticks to my neck, too,” but when she tries sticking it on her neck, the key keeps falling. She then picks up the bobby pin and tries to do the same, but the bobby pin does not stick to her neck either.

She says: “Yeah, so, if someone can explain this, that would be great.”

She points to the bobby pin which seems to momentarily balance against her neck before falling. The woman then asks if the audience has any questions.

According to Buchanan, who shared the video, the woman’s experiment followed a statement from noted COVID-19 conspiracy theorist Sherri Tenpenny, who claimed that metal in the vaccine is causing forks to stick to people’s heads.

In the video, which has been viewed more than five million times on Twitter, Tenpenny says: “Right now we’re all hypothesizing. What is it that’s actually being transmitted that’s causing all of these things? Is it a combination of the protein which now we’re finding has a metal attached to it?

 

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