The death toll from COVID in the United States has surpassed 675,000, equaling the number of deaths during the Spanish Flu Epidemic.

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The death toll from COVID in the United States has surpassed 675,000, equaling the number of deaths during the Spanish Flu Epidemic.

According to research from Johns Hopkins University, the COVID-19 death toll in the United States has reached 675,000, roughly the same number of Americans who perished during the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918-19.

COVID-19 is expected to kill an additional 100,000 Americans by January 1, according to the University of Washington, surpassing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s best estimate of the Spanish flu death toll (CDC).

The 1918-19 pandemic killed 50 million people worldwide while the world’s population was a fraction of what it is now. COVID-19 has claimed the lives of about 4.6 million people worldwide.

See the list below for more Associated Press reporting.

Because the population of the United States was only one-third of what it is today a century ago, the flu cut a much wider and more fatal swath across the country. However, the COVID-19 catastrophe is a massive tragedy in all of itself, especially given the great advances in scientific knowledge since then and the failure to fully utilize the vaccines available at the time.

Dr. Howard Markel of the University of Michigan, a medical historian, said of the possibility to vaccinate everyone eligible by now, “Big portions of American society—and, worse, their leaders—have tossed this away.”

The coronavirus, like the Spanish flu, may never completely vanish from our midst. Instead, experts are hoping that it will become a mild seasonal bug when human immunity improves as a result of vaccine and infection. That might take some time.

“We hope it will be like catching a cold, but there is no guarantee,” said Emory University biologist Rustom Antia, who predicts that this will happen in a few years.

For the time being, the epidemic has the US and the rest of the world firmly in its grip.

COVID-19 could become extinct if the virus weakens as it mutates and more and more people’s immune systems learn to attack it. The immune system improves mostly through vaccination and infection survival. Breastfed babies benefit from their moms’ immunity.

In that optimistic scenario, pupils would contract a minor illness that would help them strengthen their immune systems. The immune response memory would be carried by the youngsters as they grew older, allowing the coronavirus to infect them when they were elderly and vulnerable. This is a condensed version of the information.

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