A judge has ruled that Oklahoma can carry out the execution of Julius Jones and four others.

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A judge has ruled that Oklahoma can carry out the execution of Julius Jones and four others.

Oklahoma can carry out the executions of five death row convicts, including Julius Jones, according to a federal judge.

On Monday, Judge Stephen Friot refused the five detainees’ plea for a preliminary injunction. According to The Oklahoman, “the Supreme Court has made clear that the state’s interest in speedy enforcement of its judgments cannot be ignored.”

This week, the state will carry out its first execution in over six years. For the 1998 assassination of prison staffer Gay Carter, John Marion Grant, who was one of the five inmates seeking a stay, is slated to undergo the lethal injection on Thursday. His bid for clemency was denied earlier this month.

The inmates’ lawyer said Friot’s decision would be appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit.

In a statement to The Washington Newsday, Dale Baich stated, “We will be asking the 10th Circuit to review Judge Friot’s ruling and to impose a stay for Mr. Grant’s execution, as well as the executions scheduled in the future months.”

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals ordered Jones, Grant, and five other inmates for execution between October and March 2022.

It came after they were dropped from a lawsuit contesting Oklahoma’s lethal injection technique in August because they didn’t provide an alternative. In February 2022, the trial in that case is set to commence.

“In that opinion, the district court noted there are major doubts about Oklahoma’s medication policy and that it could cause unlawful pain and suffering,” Baich said. “Executions should not take place until the trial on that issue is held in February 2022.” On October 15, the United States Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit ordered Jones and the other detainees to be restored in the lawsuit, according to the inmates’ counsel.

Friot is on record saying that then-Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter informed him that the state would not seek executions for convicts engaged in the challenge while the litigation is pending, according to a transcript of a hearing in May 2020.

Jones, 41, was found guilty of first-degree murder in the slaying of businessman Paul Howell in 1999, although he has always maintained his innocence. This is a condensed version of the information.

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