What Are COVID-19’s Long-Term Effects On Patients? The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched a study to find out.

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What Are COVID-19’s Long-Term Effects On Patients? The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched a study to find out.

The National Institutes of Health stated that researchers will get $470 million in funding to study the long-term impact of COVID-19 infection.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 65.9% of people who tested positive for the virus had symptoms that lasted four weeks or longer.

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told reporters at a press conference on Wednesday that the monies will be distributed by New York University to fund more than 100 researchers at universities across the country. The goal is to speed up efforts to create a large “meta-cohort” of COVID-19 survivors of all ages and backgrounds who are still experiencing symptoms more than a month after their first infection.

The money for the program, known as the NIH Researching COVID to Enhance Recovery (RECOVER) Initiative, comes from the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan authorized by Congress earlier this year.

“We know that the major long-term impacts of COVID-19 have utterly upended the lives of certain people,” Collins stated at a press briefing. “The goal of these research will be to figure out what causes this often-debilitating ailment and how to help individuals who are affected get better.”

Dr. Walter Koroshetz, head of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health, said that more research with “all available instruments” is needed to figure out what causes the virus to block recovery.

Survivors of COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms, even after they have recovered from the virus. For months after their initial infection, these “long haulers” describe symptoms such as intense fatigue, headaches, dizziness, “brain fog,” and difficulty breathing. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of COVID-19 survivors who experience after-effects ranges from 5% to 80%.

In a more recent poll, the CDC found that two out of every three people who contracted the virus experienced symptoms that lasted longer than four weeks after infection.

RECOVERY hopes to enroll between 30,000 and 40,000 participants in the study, which is considered a significant cohort by academics. Dr. Gary H. Gibbons, director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health, noted that “the idea is to be a lot more aggressive here” in selecting such a big sample, with the goal of meeting milestones within the next year to 18 months.

The RECOVER initiative, on the other hand, will not be researching any. Brief News from Washington Newsday.

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