On the Fall Equinox in 2021, an asteroid that might be three times the size of the Statue of Liberty will pass Earth.

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On the Fall Equinox in 2021, an asteroid that might be three times the size of the Statue of Liberty will pass Earth.

On Wednesday, the Fall Equinox, an asteroid projected to be three times the size of the Statue of Liberty will fly by Earth.

The asteroid 2021 NY1, which might be as wide as 984 feet, will pass our planet at a distance of 93,000 miles, according to NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS).

The asteroid, which is up to three times the size of Lady Liberty, will approach our planet at a speed of roughly six miles per second. That is around 21,000 mph, or 27 times the speed of sound.

This will be the closest approach to Earth for at least a decade, according to Sky Live, which records asteroids and space objects and their orbits.

During the Fall Equinox time, the asteroid 2021 NY1 will not be alone in paying Earth a flying visit.

The smaller asteroid 2021 RX9, which is expected to be as big as the Pyramid of Giza and as tall as the Pyramid of Giza (128 feet), will fly past our planet on Tuesday at a dizzying speed of 33,000 miles per hour. That’s around 16 times the speed of a rifle bullet.

This asteroid, on the other hand, will pass by Earth at a distance of roughly 1.8 million miles.

The asteroid 2021 QV6 will also pass by Earth on Friday. This asteroid is projected to be 525 feet wide, which is about the same size as the Washington Monument. This asteroid will travel closer to Earth, roughly 2.2 million miles away.

NASA has classed all of these asteroids as Near Earth Objects, or NEOs. Asteroids or comets with orbits that bring them within 121 million miles of Earth are classified as NEOs. A space object must also complete an orbit around the Sun in less than 200 years to be classed in this way.

For the past 23 years, CNEOS has been discovering and tracking NEOs. Its mission began in 1998, when a mile-wide asteroid named 1997 XF11 was discovered to be on a collision course with Earth in 2028.

The team has detected around 25,000 NEOs since the late 1990s. They’ve narrowed it down to a. This is a condensed version of the information.

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