MIND Diet Helps Older People Develop “Cognitive Resilience,” according to a new study.

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MIND Diet Helps Older People Develop “Cognitive Resilience,” according to a new study.

Are you looking for a brain-friendly diet? According to a new study, the MIND diet may help older persons function better cognitively.

When people get older, both their minds and bodies are affected. According to a press release from Rush University Medical Center, some patients acquire “abnormal collections of proteins” called amyloid plaques and tangles in their brain tissue. These protein aggregates are the “hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease,” according to the university.

“However, not all individuals with brain pathologies experience cognitive dysfunction—some have the potential to preserve function despite damage from the buildup of brain pathologies,” according to the authors of a recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Taking Care of Your Mental Health

Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay is the name of the Mind diet. It’s a cross between the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets, which are both considered to be among the healthiest.

It has been linked to “slower cognitive decline and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in older persons,” according to the researchers, and it has been related with “slower cognitive decline and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in older adults.”

The foods in the Mediterranean and DASH diets that can boost brain function and help prevent dementia are the emphasis of this diet.

Diet Score from MIND

The researchers wanted to see if “the connection of the MIND diet with cognition is independent of known brain pathologies” for their study. They did this by following 569 people who took part in the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s ongoing Memory and Aging Project, which began in 1997 and involves adults who live in Chicago, according to Rush University Medical Center.

All of the volunteers agreed to undergo annual clinical examinations and cognitive testing to evaluate if they had developed memory or thinking issues, as well as having their brains autopsied when they died. Since 2004, they’ve also been required to fill out a food frequency questionnaire, in which they indicated how frequently they eat 144 different categories of food.

The researchers say the MIND diet score has 15 dietary components, including 10 brain-healthy food groups (green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, nuts, berries, beans/legumes, whole grains, fish, poultry, olive oil, and wine) and 5 unhealthy food groups (red meat, fried and fast foods, pastry and sweets, butter, and cheese). Brief News from Washington Newsday.

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