A Concerning COVID Variant, Nu B.1.1.529, May Have Emerged in a Person With A Weak Immune System.

0

A Concerning COVID Variant, Nu B.1.1.529, May Have Emerged in a Person With A Weak Immune System.

According to scientists, the novel B.1.1.529 COVID variation may have evolved from someone who has a chronic infection and a weaker immune system.

Multiple specialists have expressed alarm about the 32 changes in the variant’s spike protein in recent days, drawing a lot of attention to it. In order to infect human cells, the SARS-CoV-2 virus needs its spike protein.

While there is currently no experimental evidence on the variant, it is considered that B.1.1.529 may have an advantage over other variants in terms of evading the body’s immune system defenses.

Despite the fact that the variant was initially reported on just days ago using data provided to the GISAID reporting network, its origin has been hypothesized.

On Friday morning, Dr. Jacob Glanville, a computational immunologist and CEO of Centivax, tweeted: “The novel South African variety could have emerged from an immunocompromised person who was able to accumulate mutations quickly during a prolonged infection.

“To restrict this, we need to get COVID-19 chronic infection subjects on antivirals, or we’ll be back to square one.”

The new South African variation could have emerged from an immunocompromised person who was able to accumulate mutations quickly during a protracted infection. To restrict this, we need to get COVID-19 chronic infection subjects on antivirals, or we’ll be back to square one.

— Curly Jungle Jake (@CurlyJungleJake) 26 November 2021 Other experts, like Francois Balloux, director of the Genetics Institute at University College London, have shared the sentiment.

According to the Science Media Centre (SMC), he said: “B.1.1529 is a novel lineage discovered in Botswana that bears an uncommon mutation constellation.

“Given the huge number of mutations it appears to have collected in a single burst, it most likely originated during an immunocompromised person’s persistent infection, possibly in an untreated HIV/AIDS patient.”

B.1.1.529 “shows indications of cumulative mutation showing that it originated in a chronic infection,” said Ravi Gupta, a professor of clinical microbiology at the University of Cambridge, to the SMC.

Viruses constantly mutate in the humans they infect. Often, these modifications aren’t beneficial to the virus at all, and it dies out. A mutation, or a series of mutations, can sometimes be beneficial to the virus, making it better at propagating or evading the immune system.

It. This is a condensed version of the information.

Share.

Leave A Reply