The National Trust has reopened the house and studio of Liverpool photographers from the 1950s.

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The National Trust has reopened the house and studio of Liverpool photographers from the 1950s.

The National Trust is reopening a Liverpool photographer’s home and studio from the 1950s to the public.

The Hardmans’ House on Rodney Street has been shuttered since March 2020, but it will reopen for a brief time later this month.

The National Trust owns four houses in Liverpool, including this hidden gem, and has cared for it to preserve it as a 1950s “time capsule.”

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Between 1949 through 1988, Edward Chambré Hardman and his wife Margaret lived in this terraced Georgian mansion.

Edward was Liverpool’s leading portrait photographer from the 1920s through the 1960s. Ivor Novello, Margot Fonteyn, and Patricia Routledge were among the personalities with whom he collaborated.

Edward was recognized for his celebrity pictures, as well as photographs of the British environment and the development of Liverpool. Margaret was a talented photographer in her own right and ran the couple’s thriving business.

Edward died in 1988, and the National Trust bought the Rodney Street residence in 2003, together with the couple’s extensive archive of photographs and records.

59 Rodney Street is divided into four sections, each containing photography and studio equipment, as well as leftover business and personal items.

This month, the property will reopen, and guests will be able to enjoy a guided tour of the Hardmans’ home and studio.

The 45-minute tours take visitors through three floors of the house, including the couple’s photographic studio, dark room, and living quarters.

“After having to close last year because to the pandemic, we’re happy to finally be welcoming guests to discover this hidden jewel in Liverpool,” said Michelle Yunqué Alvarado, National Trust collections and house manager.

“The Hardmans were a fascinating pair, and their home is a must-see experience in and of itself. Their images are a valuable record of mid-century life in Britain, and their home is a must-see experience in and of itself.

“Many people traveled from all across Liverpool and beyond to have their photos done by Mr Hardman, and those portraits may still be hanging on the walls of their children or grandchildren today. A.”Summary concludes” for some folks.

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