The launch of a fan-led football review to offer Everton and Liverpool fans more influence has been hailed as a “momentous day.”

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The launch of a fan-led football review to offer Everton and Liverpool fans more influence has been hailed as a “momentous day.”

A fan-led review of football, performed in collaboration with the government, aims to make it more difficult for clubs to form breakaway leagues while also giving fans greater authority.

Tracey Crouch, a Conservative MP and former sports minister, chaired the assessment, which will be released tonight (November 24). It suggests that an independent regulator be established to assist in football governance.

Following Bury’s expulsion from the Football League in 2019 due to financial concerns, the government committed to a review of the footballing environment.

The failed attempt in 2021 by Liverpool, Manchester United, Manchester City, Chelsea, Arsenal, and Tottenham Hotspur, together with six other teams on the continent, to form a European Super League sparked the review process.

The review’s findings might lead to significant changes in the game, with a recommendation to establish an independent football regulator.

If it is established, the regulator will oversee a licensing system for teams with the goal of ensuring that they are financially stable enough to avoid situations like the one at Bury.

The regulator will also strengthen the fit and proper person test, which was previously used to verify whether a person investing in or purchasing a company is financially sound and trustworthy.

The research also suggests that democratic supporters groups be given the authority to veto any important decisions made by their teams. Changes to the crest or clothing, as well as the tournaments they compete in, are examples of this.

The implementation of this idea would make it hard for clubs to join breakaway leagues without the agreement of their fans, given the broad dislike of the European Super League among all fans.

The initiative’s results have been described as a “momentous day” by Fair Game, a group made up of representatives from several teams fighting for reform in football.

The report’s findings have not yet been enacted into law, but the conclusions will be presented to the government in the hopes of being confirmed.

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