The EV Revolution is being driven by data-driven electric vehicle infrastructure, and Wejo, the soon-to-be public company, is at the forefront of the space.

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The EV Revolution is being driven by data-driven electric vehicle infrastructure, and Wejo, the soon-to-be public company, is at the forefront of the space.

Environmental education and awareness are at an all-time high, with Gen Zers driving the way for change and governments vigilantly advocating for protective policies. It appears that the future is on everyone’s mind. The term “eco-friendly” is evolving from a trendy buzzword to a way of life. Given that this is being referred to as the “decisive decade” for climate action, it’s about time. One of the most often utilized pollutants, transportation, is a crucial aspect of this new green order. With cars accounting for approximately three-quarters of all CO2 emissions from transportation, transitioning to zero-emission electric vehicles is critical to meeting the 2016 Paris Agreement’s targets. One big impediment to a society dominated by electric vehicles is charging infrastructure. By supplying vital driving data and commuting analysis, Wejo, a significant participant in the connected car data industry, is clearing the road for critical infrastructure to be developed.

While the EU and the United Kingdom have both pledged to producing only zero-emission cars by 2035, and at least four major global automakers are planning to accomplish the same by 2036, the question of charging hovers overhead like the pollution we so desperately want to leave behind. The proposed infrastructure plan in the United States even included the creation of a nationwide EV charging network, with the goal of having 500,000 stations in place by 2030. Because achieving this lofty aim would necessitate coordination among local governments, businesses, automakers, and EV charging companies, someone must serve as a facilitator—enter Wejo. Using Wejo ADEPT, the company’s data engine, billions of data points from over 11 million cars are transformed into valuable data that can then be used to advise cities and states on how to build the charging infrastructure that citizens require, allowing EVs to proliferate and bringing emission-free transportation to the masses.

As more EVs hit the road, data collection and sharing will become more common, resulting in a better understanding of driving habits, a more comprehensive perspective of roadways, and, of course, a reduction in emissions. However, without solid data to guide planning, the shift to electric vehicles could face tremendous opposition. Wejo is on a mission to fill the hole, partnering with Palantir, the premier cloud data vendor. “Wejo gives us a better understanding of the terrain on the ground, as well as the interactions between electric vehicle drivers and existing infrastructure. We’re looking for patterns. The Washington Newsday Brief News is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.

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