In his Thanksgiving message, Joe Biden plays down supply chain concerns.

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In his Thanksgiving message, Joe Biden plays down supply chain concerns.

President Joe Biden has sought to reassure Americans that they will not go hungry over their Thanksgiving Day meal.

Biden’s attempt to calm anxieties about getting a meal on the table comes after months of supply chain issues and the highest annual inflation rate in three decades, at 6.2 percent.

“Families can relax today after their fears a few weeks ago that there would not be enough food for Thanksgiving. The supermarkets are loaded with turkey and everything else you’ll need “On Wednesday, he tweeted.

Families can relax today after their fears a few weeks ago that there would not be enough food for Thanksgiving.

Turkey and everything else you’ll need may be found in grocery stores.

November 24, 2021 — President Biden (@POTUS)

While the American Farm Bureau Federation did not predict food shortages, it did indicate that the average cost of a Thanksgiving feast might be up to 14% more than last year.

Using data from 50 states and Puerto Rico, the Farm Bureau blamed COVID, inflation, and the difficulties of estimating demand for supply chain disruptions over the last 20 months.

Fresh turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, buns with butter, peas, cranberries, a vegetable tray, pumpkin pie with whipped cream, and coffee and milk were among the items examined in the 36th annual poll, which was issued on November 18.

According to the Farm Bureau, the average cost of a supper for ten people on Thursday will be $53.31, up $6.41 from 2020.

Fresh turkeys were the most expensive, though the company claimed cheaper frozen turkeys would be available for Thursday’s supper.

According to estimates provided to The Washington Newsday by the United States Department of Agriculture, a basket of Thanksgiving essentials with a frozen turkey would cost 5% more.

“Everyone who wants a bird for their Thanksgiving dinner will be able to get one, and a large one will only cost $1 extra than last year,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a statement.

The United States is set to enter the new year with supply chain issues aggravated by the epidemic, including a shortage of containers, ships, and vehicles. This is a condensed version of the information.

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