In a boost for rape accuser Virginia Giuffre, the United Kingdom’s High Court will serve Prince Andrew.

0

In a boost for rape accuser Virginia Giuffre, the United Kingdom’s High Court will serve Prince Andrew.

The High Court of the United Kingdom will serve Prince Andrew in his rape case, removing a potential roadblock to the case moving forward.

Virginia Giuffre claims she was forced to have sex with the Duke of York when she was a 17-year-old trafficking victim by Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell.

She filed a lawsuit in New York, but her lawyers have been having trouble serving documents on Queen Elizabeth II’s son, who has been hiding out in private royal apartments.

Because Andrew’s status as a prince allowed him to hide out in police patrolled private dwellings, US law required that a defendant be served papers before a lawsuit can proceed, posing a considerable challenge for Giuffre.

The High Court, on the other hand, has approved a request and is “now taking steps” to serve the royal.

The court first denied Giuffre’s lawyers’ first application, but after they resubmitted it, the court granted it.

“The lawyers representing Ms. Giuffre have now presented more information to the High Court, and the High Court has accepted the request for service under the Hague Service Convention,” a spokeswoman told This website.

“The legal process has not yet been served, but unless service is provided by agreement between the parties, the High Court will take steps to serve under the Convention.”

“The bottom thing is Prince Andrew is being served,” Giuffre’s attorney David Boies told The Sun.

“That is the essence of the High Court’s ruling. He’ll be unable to refuse.”

Andrew will have 21 days to react after service, or the court will decide against him by default.

In the early 2000s, Giuffre claims she was forced to have sex with Andrew in London, New York, and the US Virgin Islands, and she was afraid for her life if she refused.

If Andrew can be served papers, the duke’s lawyer argues Giuffre signed a settlement agreement during a previous lawsuit, which will be used to try to derail the case.

“We do question the legitimacy of service to date,” Andrew Brettler, who previously represented Armie Hammer, told a New York court on Monday.

“Under UK law and the Hague Convention, the duke has not been properly served.”

“We feel, however, that this lawsuit is groundless, non-viable, and potentially unlawful,” he continued.

“Yes, there was. This is a condensed version of the information.

Share.

Leave A Reply