For allowing far-right protestors into the state Capitol, an Oregon legislator was banished.

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For allowing far-right protestors into the state Capitol, an Oregon legislator was banished.

Oregon lawmakers have fired a Republican lawmaker for allowing violent far-right protestors into the Statehouse last December.

In the House’s 160-year history, Representative Mike Nearman was the first member to be ejected.

For unruly conduct, the House voted 59-1 to exclude him from the legislature.

At a previous session, Democratic Representative Paul Holvey claimed that Mr Nearman allowed demonstrators to enter the Capitol who had planned to occupy it. Some of the participants were armed.

Rep. Nearman allowed armed, violent demonstrators inside the Capitol, jeopardizing its security.

On December 21, as MPs met in an emergency session to cope with the economic repercussions from the coronavirus outbreak, Mr Nearman was seen on security camera opening a door to demonstrators.

Protesters stormed the building, which was closed to the public due to coronavirus safety precautions, fought with authorities, and doused cops with bear spray.

Mr Holvey stated, “It’s tough to emphasize the gravity of the situation we’ve found ourselves in today.”

“Rep. Nearman allowed armed, aggressive demonstrators into the Capitol, jeopardizing the security of the Capitol, which was closed to the public, as well as the authorized personnel and legislators inside.”

The fact is that I left the building and members of the public entered the Capitol, where they had a legal right to be.

Some of the demonstrators were armed. People advocating fake QAnon conspiracy theories about Democrats stealing infants were among those who gathered outside the Capitol in Salem that day.

They hoisted American flags and placards in support of Donald Trump, the former president of the United States. One carried a sign calling for the arrest of Democratic governor Kate Brown, Mr Holvey said.

Mr Nearman was unapologetic as he read a statement to the committee.

“The fact is that I exited the building and members of the public entered into the Capitol building, a place they had a right to be — a place the Legislative Assembly had no right to exclude them from,” Mr Nearman said. He said that on legal advice he would not answer questions.

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