Data from the 2020 Census is unaffected by political interference, according to a task force.

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Data from the 2020 Census is unaffected by political interference, according to a task force.

Despite the obstacles in acquiring the headcount, an American Statistical Association task group found no evidence of political influence in the 2020 Census.

State-by-state population totals were accurate, according to the study, albeit the data provided to the task force lacked demographic information on race and Hispanic origin, as well as localities smaller than states. There were no abnormalities discovered by the task committee, confirming that the 2020 estimates were correct for use in apportioning congressional seats.

“We didn’t identify any abnormalities that were immediate sources of concern that you couldn’t utilize the data,” Nancy Potok, a former US chief statistician who chaired the task team, told the Associated Press.

The COVID-19 epidemic, many natural catastrophes, and a political dispute over former President Donald Trump’s administration’s desire to add a citizenship question on the questionnaire all hampered data collection for the 2020 Census.

The Census Bureau postponed the release of the apportionment statistics until April in order to give the count additional time to be reviewed.

See the list below for more Associated Press reporting.

Because of concerns highlighted by the census’s hurdles until a more in-depth investigation could be undertaken, the task group was formed last year to investigate the quality of the initial data. Robert Santos, the association’s president, was a task force co-chair until President Joe Biden selected him to be the next Census Bureau director.

The Census Bureau allowed three outside statisticians to look for potential opportunities for errors in census numbers that were greater in 2020 than they were in 2010. As part of the task force’s review, the Census Bureau allowed three outside statisticians to look for potential opportunities for errors in census numbers that were greater in 2020 than they were in 2010. Using ten measurements, statisticians awarded a score to each state’s potential mistake hazards.

Alaska, New Jersey, Utah, New York, and Texas, Montana, and New Mexico were identified as the states with the highest likelihood for more errors in 2020 than in 2010. Nebraska, Indiana, Tennessee, Kentucky, Idaho, Delaware, South Dakota, and South Carolina had the lowest risks.

The statisticians write, “These states have highly distinct populations and range from primarily urban to mostly rural… which implies that the error risks apply to widely diverse populations and not only to densely or poorly inhabited portions of the country.” This is a condensed version of the information.

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