California Wildfires 2021: The Alisal Fire Has Grown To 15K Acres, Resulting In New Evacuation Orders

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California Wildfires 2021: The Alisal Fire Has Grown To 15K Acres, Resulting In New Evacuation Orders

More than 800 firefighters are still fighting the Alisal Fire in California, which has spread to 15,442 acres since it began Monday northwest of Refugio Canyon. As a result of the fire, further evacuation orders have been issued.

New evacuation orders have been issued for Arroyo Hondo Canyon, the area between El Capitan Beach State Park and West Camino Cielo, and Refugio Canyon in Santa Barbara County. Residents were told to “leave the area immediately” by the County Sheriff’s Department. Residents living south of West Camino Cielo, east of El Capitan Beach State Park, and west of Dos Pueblos Canyon Rd were also advised to evacuate.

The Alisal fire also shut down parts of Highway 101 and Amtrak lines across the country, according to CNN. Officials said the fire was just 5% contained as of Wednesday evening. It is now burning in Refugio Canyon, 20 miles northwest of Santa Barbara.

According to CBS News, Santa Barbara County Supervisor Joan Hartmann remarked at a community briefing that the Alisal fire “is a reminder that as summer winds down, our fire season picks up.” Strong gusts are further fuelling the swiftly spreading fire, according to local officials.

The Alisal fire was also a “wind-driven fire,” according to Santa Barbara County Fire Chief Mark Hartwig, who warned that the weather is causing the flames to spread faster.

Pacific Gas & Electric issued a press release on Tuesday informing 16,000 customers of scheduled power interruptions on Thursday due to “fire weather.” The disruptions would occur “in selected sections of 12 counties,” according to the company. Customers are encouraged to check the monitoring site for updates on potential safety shutoffs.

The Santa Barbara Public Health Department has also issued an Air Quality Watch for the area, stating that the fire has created “a dynamic situation” in which “local air quality conditions can change quickly.” When locals see or smell smoke from the fire, air pollution control officials advise them to “go indoors and stay indoors as much as possible.”

The Santa Barbara Public Health Department has also issued an Air Quality Watch for the area, stating that the fire has created “a dynamic situation” in which “local air quality conditions can change quickly.” When locals see or smell smoke from the fire, air pollution control officials advise them to “go indoors and stay indoors as much as possible.”

According to the most recent update on the on Wednesday evening. The Washington Newsday Brief News is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.

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