California was the first state to remove its high COVID transmission status, and now has the lowest case rate in the country.

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California was the first state to remove its high COVID transmission status, and now has the lowest case rate in the country.

California was the only state classified by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Wednesday as having a “low” level of COVID-19 community transmission.

Every other state was highlighted in red on a CDC map, the color the agency used to denote areas with high levels of community transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defined “high” community transmission of the virus as sites with a seven-day average of 100 new cases per 100,000 persons or higher.

California has recorded an average of 97.8 new cases per 100,000 individuals over the last seven days, putting the state in the category of “substantial” community viral transmission, according to the CDC’s map. The CDC defines a “substantial” level as a seven-day average case rate of 50 to 99.99 new cases per 100,000 individuals.

On Tuesday, the San Francisco Chronicle was one of the first to notice a reduction in community transmission levels in California.

According to the CDC’s data, the United States as a whole has a “high” level of community transmission, with a seven-day average of 295 cases per 100,000 persons and a seven-day positive rate of 9.49 percent.

The California Department of Public Health has been contacted for comment, and we will update this item if we receive a response.

This is a developing story, and more information will be added as it becomes available.

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