After an activist exposes them in a viral video, Coach promises to stop destroying returned merchandise [Video].

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After an activist exposes them in a viral video, Coach promises to stop destroying returned merchandise [Video].

In a famous TikTok video, environmental activist Anna Sacks accuses luxury brand Coach of slicing unsold bags and putting them in the trash. Coach has said that it will “stop destroying” returned products as a result of the video’s outrage.

Sacks exhibited ripped purses she bought from Garbage Diving Mama, an influencer who found them in a Coach store dumpster in Dallas, in a video posted to her TikTok account @tdheetrashwalker.

The film has received over 2.2 million views and has sparked considerable debate over the company’s sustainability stance.

“This is what they do with unwanted stuff; they have an employee purposefully slash it so no one can use it,” Sacks explained, pointing to a collection of destroyed bags she discovered.

“Then they write it off as a tax write-off using the same tax loophole as if it was destroyed accidently,” she charged.

Coach, for its part, stated in a statement that it “is not claiming any tax benefits for in-store returns that are unsalable and not able to be given and were destroyed in store.”

Coach declared on Instagram that “we have now discontinued discarding in-store returns of damaged and unsaleable goods and are committed to optimizing such product reuse through our Coach (Re)Loved and other circulation initiatives.”

Sacks, on the other hand, is skeptical of the move and want to see the brand stop burning all unsellable things, not only returned merchandise. “I think that’s a step in the right way,” she told Forbes, “but it also appeared purposely restricting.”

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Sacks also chastised the company for its repair program, which encourages customers to patch their leather goods as the corporation orders them to be slashed.

“However, according to their website, they are quite concerned about sustainability,” she opined.

Coach said in a statement to Forbes that these products were returned or were somehow damaged and unable to be sold or donated, and that they accounted for up to 1% of their global product line. They also revealed that 40% of their retailers have already offered to repair or replace broken bags or accessories.

Last year, the company contributed over $55 million in merchandise to help low-income families and individuals in need, according to the corporation.

Many premium firms trash their excess stock in order to encourage customers to choose new models and designs. The Washington Newsday Brief News is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.

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