According to a UN official, the trip to Iran made no progress in learning about the country’s nuclear program.

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According to a UN official, the trip to Iran made no progress in learning about the country’s nuclear program.

According to the Associated Press, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) stated Wednesday that inspectors are still attempting to figure out what is going on at Iran’s nuclear energy sites.

This week, IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi met with Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization (AEOI), but no progress was made in restoring the agency’s capacity to monitor the country’s nuclear program.

According to the Associated Press, the IAEA has a secret arrangement to use surveillance cameras to monitor Iran’s nuclear sites. Since February, however, the agency has been unable to obtain imagery from the cameras. This is due to a law passed by the Iranian parliament in December 2020 that promised to halt UN inspections if European signatories did not lift oil and banking sanctions.

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are concerned that they will not be able to view the footage because to Tehran’s expanding uranium stockpile, some of which is enriched to 60 percent purity. The percentage of weapons-grade uranium is 90%.

Grossi told reporters in Vienna that the talks could not be completed and that they were therefore inconclusive. Meeting Mohammad Eslami, the AEOI’s new director, and Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian, he said, was a “good factor” that would “definitely help.” “We’re getting close to the moment where I won’t be able to guarantee knowledge continuation,” Grossi added. “I’m not given up on trying to get an understanding,” she says, “but we were unable to reach an agreement on what we discussed yesterday.” See the list below for more Associated Press reporting.

Grossi did not give a timeline, but said that a prolonged absence of access to a centrifuge components manufacturing location near Karaj, in the north, “would at some point prevent me from continuing to state that I have a notion of what is going on.”

The IAEA also put roughly 2,000 tamper-proof seals on nuclear material and equipment as part of its accord with Iran. Inspectors were able to contact with those seals via electronic means. Real-time data from the program was also provided by automated measuring devices. Inspectors have also been unable to obtain such information, making monitoring Iran’s enriched uranium stockpile much more difficult.

The IAEA has also requested that activity at a centrifuge parts manufacturing plant near Karaj be monitored. Since June, after Iran, the IAEA has been denied entry. This is a condensed version of the information.

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