Nicki Minaj’s anti-vaccine tweets aren’t breaking any rules, according to Twitter.

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Nicki Minaj’s anti-vaccine tweets aren’t breaking any rules, according to Twitter.

Nicki Minaj’s posts promoting the COVID-19 vaccine did not breach Twitter’s misleading rules, according to the company.

The artist shocked fans when she announced that she will not be attending the Met Gala since she is still unvaccinated against coronavirus.

“They want you to get vaccinated for the Met,” says the narrator. It won’t be for the Met if I get vaccinated. It’ll be when I feel like I’ve done enough research,” the “Superbass” singer told her 22.6 million fans on Twitter, adding, “I’m working on that now.” In the meantime, stay safe, my loves. Wear the mask with the two strings around your head and face. “Not that haphazard one.”

Despite the immediate criticism, things became strange when the 38-year-old attempted to excuse her actions with an inadvertently unusual and amusing narrative.

Minaj stated that a family member had a bad reaction to the vaccine and became impotent as a result.

“My cousin in Trinidad would not have the vaccine because his friend received it and became impotent as a result. “His testicles swelled up,” she wrote.

“His friend was set to marry in a few weeks, but the girl called off the wedding. So just pray about it and make sure you’re comfortable with your decision rather than feeling pressured.”

The rapper received a lot of flak after the post, with a lot of other high-profile people and celebrities accusing her of disseminating false information.

My relative in Trinidad will not have the vaccine because his friend received it and became impotent as a result. His testicles swelled up. His friend was set to marry in a few weeks, but the girl decided to call off the wedding. So just pray about it and make sure you’re comfortable with your decision rather than being bullied into it.

September 13, 2021 — Nicki Minaj (@NICKIMINAJ)

Minaj’s allegations of impotence were even disputed by a public health specialist.

Impotency is not a recognized side effect of the licensed coronavirus vaccinations, according to Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University.

Dr. Wen informed the publication, “It is just not true that obtaining the COVID-19 vaccine is related with infertility in either males or females.”

“In reality, we know that if someone develops COVID-19, there are ramifications in terms of the male’s impact. This is a condensed version of the information.

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