The NTSB found that Tesla’s automated steering system did not work on the road where the Houston crash occurred.

0

The NTSB found that Tesla’s automated steering system did not work on the road where the Houston crash occurred.

According to a government study published Monday, authorities discovered that the automatic steering system of a Tesla involved in a fiery crash in Houston could have been disabled at the time of the accident.

The Tesla veered off the road on Hammock Dunes Place, a two-lane residential street in Spring, Texas, on the evening of April 17. According to the Associated Press, the car then struck a curb, a raised manhole, and a tree, destroying the vehicle’s high-voltage lithium-ion battery and igniting a fire that killed the 59-year-old owner and 69-year-old passenger.

During its investigation, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said it tested another Tesla on the same lane, but the Autopilot driver-assist system could not be completely utilized. According to the study, investigators were unable to reach the system’s automatic steering system but were able to use Traffic Aware Cruise Control.

See the list below for further Associated Press reporting.

According to a government study released Monday, home surveillance camera video shows the owner of a Tesla getting into the driver’s seat of the car shortly before a fatal crash in suburban Houston.

However, the official report on the accident, which claimed the lives of two men, does not explain why no one was found behind the wheel of the vehicle, which burst into flames after crashing about 550 feet from the owner’s house. It’s also unclear if Tesla’s partially automatic driver-assist system, “Autopilot,” was in use at the time of the crash, but that seems impossible.

The National Transportation Safety Board said it is also looking at all aspects of the accident. However, fire destroyed an onboard data storage system in the console. A device that tracks air bag and seat belt status, as well as speed and acceleration, was damaged and is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board.

Both cruise control and automatic steering are needed for Autopilot to work. Although autosteer keeps the car in its own lane, Traffic Aware Cruise Control will keep it a safe distance from vehicles in front of it.

In its study, the NTSB said, “The NTSB continues to collect data to assess crash dynamics, postmortem toxicology test results, seat belt use, occupant egress, and electric vehicle fires.” “All aspects of the accident are still being investigated.” This is a condensed version of the information.

Share.

Leave A Reply