‘Dexter’: Die ursprüngliche Titelsequenz war zu düster für Showtime

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This fall, Dexter returns with 10 brand new episodes. Until then, many fans can’t stop theorizing about what Dexter Morgan’s new life will look like – including his morning routine.

The series title sequence documents the serial killer’s habits in a masterful way. Considering how popular this sequence is, it’s funny to imagine that the intro of Dexter would have looked almost completely different.

The opening title sequence of “Dexter” is iconic

Opening sequence for Dexter is Dexter Morgan’s (Michael C. Hall) morning routine. It sounds boring, but the way Dexter picks at his breakfast food like one of his victims adds a creepy element to the otherwise mundane goings-on in the sequence.

 

The intro to Dexter doesn’t skimp on bloody symbols, either. From the bubbling blood orange to the splatter of hot sauce on Dexter’s plate to the physical drops of blood resulting from a razor cut, the series’ title sequence plays on the irony of Dexter’s choice of profession and the “dark passenger” he controls by killing. The interplay of these elements with the playful background music makes the Dexter introduction a small masterpiece.

The TV series “Dexter” originally had a “darker” intro.

While visually the original version of the Dexter intro isn’t too different, the background music was much heavier and more off-putting. Eric S. Anderson, who was responsible for the original Dexter title sequence, initially used Bernard Herrmann’s Alfred Hitchcock score.

“[The makers of Dexter] kept using the word ‘mundane,'” Anderson told Paste Magazine. “They liked Six Feet Under and Nip/Tuck for how mundane both titles were with what could have been a visually hyperbolized representation of each show’s theme.”

With this in mind, Anderson began thinking about ways to “make normal, everyday things horrible.” The original premise was to have Dexter make his breakfast, brush his teeth with dental floss and tie his shoes as brutally as possible. “But that soon turned into the idea of recontextualizing normal things in a creepy way, the way crime scene photography does,” Anderson said.

Considering the original score and the “cut and chopped” style in the first version, the showrunners felt that the original title sequence for Dexter might have left a different impression on fans. After all, Dexter Morgan is a forensics expert turned serial killer that fans have come to know and love, as strange as that may sound.

‘Dexter’ intro morning routine slightly altered

Anderson always saw the title sequence as Dexter being Dexter. “He doesn’t go through a massive transformation when he becomes a serial killer,” he told Art of the Title. “He’s exactly the same Dexter, except something [isn’t] right. I really thought that was going to go somewhere.”

Dexter- Art of the Title sequence http://t.co/BzCadvz82b pic.twitter.com/9JQXnLULFZ

– TV Time (@tvshowtime) March 6, 2014

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In the original version of the title sequence, Dexter is still cutting himself while shaving, flossing and preparing breakfast. But what he prepares in the kitchen looks drastically different. Instead of ham and eggs, Dexter appears to be cutting up a liver and cooking it on the stove.

After some minor changes to Dexter’s diet, composer Rolfe Kent perfected Dexter’s title sequence with a significant uptick in music. The composer also worked on songs for such films as “Fight Club,” “Zoolander” and “You, Me and Dupree.”

Will the “Dexter” reboot have the same title sequence?

Considering how iconic and familiar the current title sequence is, it’s unlikely that the showrunners will make any changes for Dexter season 9. The only time Dexter’s intro was changed was in season 4, where Dexter goes through his morning routine but everything is wrong (he doesn’t shave, his shoelaces break).

Fans will have to tune in to season 9 when it airs to see if there are any changes to the Dexter intro. Stay tuned for updates on the Dexter reboot.

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